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How to Cite a Speech in Harvard Style?

Published by at August 30th, 2021 , Revised On November 11, 2021

 

There are several ways to cite and reference a speech in Harvard style. It all depends on the mode of delivery. Speeches can be in the form of live speeches that one hears in person, or they can be online recordings of a speech that was given live. In research, a respondent’s answers can also be considered his or her speech.

Therefore, depending on how it was delivered and where it was retrieved from, a speech can be cited and referenced in different ways according to Harvard style.

 

Types of Speeches and How They’re Cited with Examples

 

1.    Citing a live (in-person) speech

The basic format for such a source in Harvard style is:

In-text citation: (Speaker Surname Year speech was delivered)

Reference entry list: Speaker Surname, Speaker Initial(s). Year speech was delivered.  Title of speech in italics. Date of speech, location of the speech.

For example:

In-text citation: (Obama 2008)

Reference entry list: Obama, B. 2008. A more perfect union. 18 March, National Constitution Centre, Philadelphia.

 

2.    Citing an online recorded speech

The Harvard citation and referencing style for this type of source is:

In-text citation: (Speaker Surname Year speech was delivered)

Reference entry list: Speaker Surname, Speaker Initial(s). Year speech was delivered. Title of speech in italics. [Online]. Date of speech, location of the speech. [Date accessed]. Available from: URL

For example:

In-text citation: (Obama 2008)

Reference entry list: Obama, B. 2008. A more perfect union. [Online]. 18 March, National Constitution Centre, Philadelphia. [Accessed 10 June 2017]. Available from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHuDLM-xiBo

 

3.    Citing a speech broadcasted on television or radio

The format for such a source according to Harvard style is:

In-text citation: (Speaker Surname Year speech was delivered)

Reference entry list: Speaker Surname, Speaker Initial(s). Year speech was delivered. Title of speech. Date of speech, location of the speech. Title of programme in italics. Transmitting organisation/TV or radio channel. Date of the original transmission.

For example:

In-text citation: (Obama 2008)

Reference entry list: Obama, B. 2008. A more perfect union. 18 March, National Constitution Centre, Philadelphia. Newsnight. BBC. 1 September 2008.

 

4.    Citing a transcribed speech

The basic format for this type of source as per Harvard style is:

In-text citation: (Speaker Surname Year speech was delivered or transcribed, whichever is available)

Reference entry list: Speaker Surname, Speaker Initial(s). Year speech was delivered/transcribed. Title of the speech. In: Transcriber’s or Editor’s Surname, Initial(s). edn(s). Year transcribed material was published. Title of source containing the transcription, e.g., a book, in italics. Place of publication: Publisher, p.# for a single page or pp.# for page range.

For example:

In-text citation: (Clinton 2011)

Reference entry list: Clinton, H. 2011. Strength in resilience. In: Wilson, H. ed. 2012. Representative American speeches 2011-2012. Ipswich, MA.: H.W. Wilson, pp.97-100.

 

Citing Speeches with Multiple Speakers

In such a case, the citation, as well as reference list formats, are the same as those for citing and referencing a book with multiple authors.

 

Citing Speeches from Personal Communications

If a research participant’s or respondent’s direct quotes are being cited, the same format as that of citing personal communications is followed according to Harvard style.

 

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About Alaxendra Bets

Bets completed her degree in English Literature in 2014. She has been working as a professional editor and writer with Research Prospect since then. Bets loves to help students improve their learning.